An analysis of racial themes in the adventures of huckleberry finn by mark twain

In Missouri[ edit ] The story begins in fictional St. Petersburg, Missouri based on the actual town of Hannibal, Missourion the shore of the Mississippi River "forty to fifty years ago" the novel having been published in Huckleberry "Huck" Finn the protagonist and first-person narrator and his friend, Thomas "Tom" Sawyer, have each come into a considerable sum of money as a result of their earlier adventures detailed in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Huck explains how he is placed under the guardianship of the Widow Douglas, who, together with her stringent sister, Miss Watson, are attempting to "sivilize" him and teach him religion.

An analysis of racial themes in the adventures of huckleberry finn by mark twain

When he was four years old, his family moved to Hannibal, a town on the Mississippi River much like the towns depicted in his two most famous novels, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Clemens spent his young life in a fairly affluent family that owned a number of household slaves.

But Hannibal proved too small to hold Clemens, who soon became a sort of itinerant printer and found work in a number of American cities, including New York and Philadelphia.

An analysis of racial themes in the adventures of huckleberry finn by mark twain

While still in his early twenties, Clemens gave up his printing career in order to work on riverboats on the Mississippi. Clemens eventually became a riverboat pilot, and his life on the river influenced him a great deal.

Life on the river also gave Twain material for several of his books, including the raft scenes of Huckleberry Finn and the material for his autobiographical Life on the Mississippi Clemens continued to work on the river untilwhen the Civil War exploded across America and shut down the Mississippi for travel and shipping.

Although Clemens joined a Confederate cavalry division, he was no ardent Confederate, and when his division deserted en masse, he did too. He then made his way west with his brother Orion, working first as a silver miner in Nevada and then stumbling into his true calling, journalism.

Character Analysis

InClemens began to sign articles with the name Mark Twain. As the nation prospered economically in the post—Civil War period—an era that came to be known as the Gilded Age, an epithet that Twain coined—so too did Twain.

His books were sold door-to-door, and he became wealthy enough to build a large house in Hartford, Connecticut, for himself and his wife, Olivia, whom he had married in Twain began work on Huckleberry Finn, a sequel to Tom Sawyer, in an effort to capitalize on the popularity of the earlier novel. This new novel took on a more serious character, however, as Twain focused increasingly on the institution of slavery and the South.

Twain soon set Huckleberry Finn aside, perhaps because its darker tone did not fit the optimistic sentiments of the Gilded Age. In the early s, however, the hopefulness of the post—Civil War years began to fade. Reconstruction, the political program designed to reintegrate the defeated South into the Union as a slavery-free region, began to fail.

The harsh measures the victorious North imposed only embittered the South. Concerned about maintaining power, many Southern politicians began an effort to control and oppress the black men and women whom the war had freed.

His wife had long been sickly, and the couple lost their first son after just nineteen months. Twain also made a number of poor investments and financial decisions and, infound himself mired in debilitating debt.

SparkNotes: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Motifs

As his personal fortune dwindled, he continued to devote himself to writing. Drawing from his personal plight and the prevalent national troubles of the day, he finished a draft of Huckleberry Finn inand by had it ready for publication.

The novel met with great public and critical acclaim. Twain continued to write over the next ten years.

SparkNotes: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Context

Personal tragedy also continued to hound Twain: Despite his personal troubles, however, Twain continued to enjoy immense esteem and fame and continued to be in demand as a public speaker until his death in The story of Huckleberry Finn, however, does not end with the death of its author.

The novel occasionally has been banned in Southern states because of its steadfastly critical take on the South and the hypocrisies of slavery. The fact that the historical context in which Twain wrote made his use of the word insignificant—and, indeed, part of the realism he wanted to create—offers little solace to some modern readers.

Ultimately, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has proved significant not only as a novel that explores the racial and moral world of its time but also, through the controversies that continue to surround it, as an artifact of those same moral and racial tensions as they have evolved to the present day.In Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Jim represents different things to Huck that make him a father-figure.

Jim loves Huck and forgives him when he his less than kind to him, and. Prejudice and Racism in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, is an excellent example of racism in literature, because it uses language describing African Americans which goes beyond satire.

An analysis of racial themes in the adventures of huckleberry finn by mark twain

A summary of Motifs in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Prejudice and Racism in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, is an excellent example of racism in literature, because it uses language describing African Americans which goes beyond satire.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (or, in more recent editions, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn) is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in the United Kingdom in . LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.

Though Mark Twain wrote The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn after the abolition of slavery in the United States, the novel itself is set before the Civil War, when slavery was still legal and the economic foundation of the American South.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Wikipedia